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M71
Award in Emotional Intelligence: A Practical Experience

MQF Level: 7

ECTS Value: 3 ECTS

Duration: 6 Sessions

Contact Hours: 15

Self Study Hours: 36

Assessment Hours: 24

 

Course Description

A prospective teacher needs to be emotionally literate in one’s personal life and at the place of work. In addition, a prospective teacher must be skilled in equipping students with emotional literacy which is essential for the holistic well-being of the individual. Through this module, participants will be able to work on themselves so that they further develop their emotional literacy skills and reflect on the importance of such skills within the classroom setting.

Entry Requirements

Applicants interested in following this programme are to be in possession of a Bachelor’s degree (MQF 6 with a minimum of 180 ECTS, or equivalent).  

Overall Objectives and Outcomes


By the end of this module, the learner will be able to:

Competences

a) Critically investigate the importance of emotional literacy in one’s life and in the classroom setting;
b) Differentiate between emotional intelligence and emotional literacy;
c) Work on one’s emotional literacy.

Knowledge 

a) Critically investigate the importance of emotional literacy in one’s life and in the classroom setting;
b) Differentiate between emotional intelligence and emotional literacy;
c) Work on one’s emotional literacy.

Skills

a) Apply and critically reflect on the theoretical aspects of emotional literacy to their personal life and classroom setting;
b) Show how emotional literacy and emotional intelligence can take place;
c) Demonstrate ways to overcome challenges related to emotional literacy.

Mode of Delivery

This module adopts a blended approach to teaching and learning. Information related to the structure and delivery of the module may be accessed through the IfE Portal. For further details, kindly refer to the Teaching, Learning and Assessment Policy and Procedures found on the Institute for Education’s website.  

Assessment Methods

This programme adopts continuous and summative methods of assessment including assignments, online tasks, reflective journals, projects and video presentations. For further details, kindly refer to the Teaching, Learning and Assessment Policy and Procedures.

Certification

Upon successful completion of this module, course participants will be conferred an accredited certification. 

Further Learning Opportunities and Career Progression

Upon successful completion of this module, course participants may use certification conferred to apply for Recognition of Prior Learning for accredited programmes. Teachers may also use this certification in their application for accelerated progression.

Suggested Readings

Core Reading List
1) Bezzina, A., Falzon, R., & Muscat,M. (2015). Emotional intelligence and the Maltese personal and social development model. In Zysberg, L. & Raz, S. (Eds.). Emotional intelligence: Current evidence from psychopathological educational and organisational perspectives (pp. 151-171).
New York: Nova Science Publishers, Inc.

2) Camilleri, S., Caruana, A., Falzon, R., & Muscat, M. (2012). The promotion of emotional literacy through personal and social development: the Maltese experience. Pastoral Care in Education, 30(1), 19-37.

3) James, C., Bore, M., & Zito, S. (2012). Emotional intelligence and personality as predictors of psychological well-being. Journal of Psychoeducational Assessment, 30(4), 425-438.

Supplementary Reading List

1) Michaelson, J., Mahony, S., & Schifferes, J. (2012). Measuring wellbeing. A guide for practitioners. A short book for voluntary organizations and community groups. London: NEF.

2) Feinstein, L., Vorhaus, J., & Sabates, R. (2008). Mental Capital and Wellbeing: Making the most of ourselves in the 21st century. Learning through life: Future challenges, Government Office for Science.

3) Cross, T. L. (2002). Putting the Well-Being of All Students (Including Gifted Students) First. Gifted Child Today, 25(4), 14-17.

4) United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO). (2012). Youth and skills: putting education to work. UNESCO, Paris, France.

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